Rumble Strips & Singing Roads

Rumble Strips & Singing Roads

Whether you call them, “sleeper lines,” “growlers,” or the “the corduroy,” Rumble Strips are an essential part of the U.S. Depart of Transportation Federal Highway Administration’s safety protocols. Most roadway accidents are caused by driver in attention and/or drowsiness. The noise and vibrations that Rumble Strips make provide an effective warning to drivers, refocus their attention to the road, and can help prevent both lane departure and head-on collision accidents. And, if you are driving along a stretch of Route 66 in New Mexico, and you drive over the Rumble Strip that has been installed on this portion of the roadway, you can even hear it “sing” America the Beautiful.

There are three main types of rumble strips:

  • Center-line Rumble Strips – used primarily on two-lane, undivided highways, and provide an effective countermeasure to cross-over accidents.
  • Shoulder Rumble Strips – installed on the shoulder, or edge of the road, and let driver’s know when they have drifted to far outside of the roadway, and need to move back onto the lane pavement.
  • Transverse Rumble Strips – placed where traveling vehicles will cross them before they come upon a known hazard, dangerous intersection, or even a construction job-site, and warn drivers to slow-down and pay attention to potential driving hazards.

Rumble Strips can be installed using a variety of construction methods, such as: the Rolled-in method, which is applied to newly laid asphalt while the material is still warm and mold-able; and the Milled-in method, which can be applied to the pavement after it has already hardened.

B. Jackson Construction is Utah’s premier Rumble Strip contractor. We have completed countless miles of rumble strip installs. We have a ROCK SOLID team of professionals, and the milling equipment, to help you complete any rumble strip project you through our way.

Contact us to today and learn more about how we can help you!

References:

  1. http://safety.fhwa.dot.gov/roadway_dept/pavement/rumble_strips/
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumble_strip
  3. http://krqe.com/2014/10/01/route-66-singing-road-debuts-in-new-mexico/
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